A Metaphor for Refractive Errors

Almost anything the most beautiful possible can be perceived only through the eyes. The eyes have long been considered as an essential organ for all sighted individuals. The eye is in fact a very complex organ that consist of various delicate parts. Each of these parts describes careful protection. Putting aside its complexity, the eye can be considered as a circle. It is easy to understand that the image of the circle will fall at the opposite side on the margin of the circle if a person shines a candle light in front of the circle. However, people with refractive errors have irregular eye balls. Taking the same example, the image of the candle light falls either in front or far behind the circle because of the irregular shape of the circle itself. This metaphor simply explains the principle of refractive errors. The reason is that those pamphlets are always hard to understand.

Once told to wear a pair of corrective eye glasses, either a child or an adult will probably get agitated or annoyed. However, it is often inevitable while the doctor believes that the glasses are the best solution. Refractive errors including nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism are the exact reasons for the need to use prescription glasses. It is impossible to shrink the eye by making a hole. Nor it is possible to make it enlarge by blowing air into it. Eyeglasses with appropriate powers are now widely used to make the eyes focus properly. Applying these lenses to the same metaphor, they are actually located in between the candle light and the circle. By adding such a lens, the image will fall exactly on the circle. Prescription lenses come with either minus or plus powers, corresponding to farsightedness or nearsightedness respectively. Just get relaxed when you are told to use eyeglasses.



Source by Cliff Krause