Tips for Choosing BBCOR Bats

Most baseball players, whether amateurs or professionals, know that BBCOR stands for batted ball coefficient of restitution, but they may not realize what exactly that means and how it might affect their games. BBCOR certification regulates the amount of energy lost when the bat contacts the baseball and ensures that non-wood bats perform similarly to wood. BBCOR bats are stamped after certification with the number .50, which is just slightly higher than the measure of traditional wooden baseball bats.

Why it’s Important

High school and collegiate student-athletes must use BBCOR-certified bats whenever they play games. If their bats are not stamped with a .50, they are not considered officially certified. Athletes still have plenty of options when it comes to choosing the hottest bbcor bats, though. Read on to find out more.

The Length

The majority of BBCOR bats range in length from 31 inches to 34 inches, but some manufacturers also offer bats in 29 and 30-inch lengths. Players should take their height and weight into consideration when choosing a bat length, but they should also bear in mind that, ultimately, the choice is one of personal preference.

The Weight

All BBCOR bats feature the same length-to-weight ratio, or drop, of -3. In order to determine a bat’s weight, take its length and subtract three from it. Since all BBCOR bats feature the same drop, there’s not much need to worry about weight.

The Material

The majority of BBCOR bats are composed of either aluminum or a composite material. Aluminum bats, which are also referred to as alloy bats, offer a traditional feel and immediate impact feedback. Composite bats offer improved performance thanks to a lower vibration rate, a larger sweet spot, and greater longevity.

Learn More Today

While it’s important for athletes to understand the differences between different BBCOR bats and to be able to identify whether or not a bat has been BBCOR certified, provided certification is present the decision is still largely one of personal preference. Most experts suggest that serious student-athletes try at least a few different bats to get a feel for which materials and lengths provide the best fit.